<div dir="ltr"><h2>
        Broadening Powers of Lawful Disruption into Cyberspace
      </h2>
      
          
            <table>
        <tbody><tr>
          <td class=""><span class=""><strong>Date:</strong></span></td>
          
           <td>Friday 28 August
            
          
          </td>
        </tr>
                <tr>
          <td class=""><span class=""><strong>Time:</strong></span></td>
        <td>
          1.00 pm - 2.00 pm
          
        </td>
        </tr>
            <tr>  
        <td class="">
          <span class=""><strong>Venue: </strong></span></td>
        <td> 
                      
         
        AGSE 211, AGSE Building,  
        Hawthorn Campus  
        </td>
   
    </tr>   
       
          <tr><td class=""><strong>Cost:</strong></td><td>Free </td></tr>
<tr>
           
                  

                  
  
                  
                
                

                

                

                

                

                

                
  
            </tr></tbody></table>
      <hr>
      
      
      <p>Amidst reinvigorated concerns over &#39;radicalization&#39; and 
domestic terrorism, Western governments are pursuing some of the most 
drastic changes to national security legislation since 9/11. These 
changes twin unprecedented technical capabilities with expanded legal 
powers for security intelligence agencies and law enforcement. This talk
 explores the most recent manifestations of pre-emptive 
counter-terrorism measures in Canada, Australia, and the United States, 
and unpacks their potential in the context of digital communication 
environments. In particular, the talk highlights emergent challenges for
 the administration of justice, democratic accountability, and human 
rights regarding the policing of radicalization in online environments.</p>
<h2>Presenter</h2>
<p><span><strong>Adam Molnar</strong>┬áis a Lecturer in Criminology at 
Deakin University Melbourne, Australia where he researches and teaches 
on issues at the intersection of national security, policing, 
surveillance and technology. Molnar is a senior research affiliate of 
the Terrorism, Security, and Society (TSAS) Research network. He 
recently completed a postdoctoral fellowship at the Queen&#39;s University 
Surveillance Studies Centre, and completed his PhD at the University of 
Victoria.</span><br><span><strong><br></strong></span></p>
<h2><span><span>About the SISR Seminar Series</span></span></h2>
<p><span>The <a href="http://www.swinburne.edu.au/research/institute-social-research/">Swinburne Institute for Social Research</a>
 seminar series encourages interdisciplinary dialogue on contemporary 
social policy issues and related themes, featuring Swinburne staff and 
postgraduate students, as well as external guest speakers. Researchers 
at the Swinburne Institute work across a range of disciplines, including
 urban planning, economics, statistics, sociology, history, media 
studies and political science.</span></p>
<h3>Subscribe</h3>
<span> For enquiries or subscribe to our seminar mailing list, please email: <a href="mailto:isrevents@swin.edu.au">isrevents@swin.edu.au</a></span></div>